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26A Ordinary Time – Topics

Lector's Notes
by Gregory Warnusz

First Reading

Ezekiel is very contentious here. He deserves a vigorous proclamation. A good way to deliver this in your Sunday congregation would be to imagine you are Jesus in that heated discussion with the chief priests and elders. Their arrogance is getting to you, so you reach in your pocket, pull out your copy of Ezekiel, open it and say, “Oh yeah? Well, listen to this: ‘You say the Lord’s way is not fair! Hear now, house of Israel: Is it my way or your way that’s unfair? . . .'” Don’t be afraid to sound vehement. Ezekiel wasn’t; he was talking (and you’ll be reading) about issues of life and death.

Second Reading

The English translation available to us doesn’t seem poetic or worthy of singing. Until the right poet/musician comes along who can render the passage more beautifully, it’s up to you speak it faithfully, with the solemnity that its venerable status calls for. (Tony Carlin, Music and Liturgy Director of Saint John the Baptist Catholic Church in Napa, California, U.S.A, says the right poet/musician may have arrived. He recommends “Ken Canedo’s new ‘Jesus Christ Is Lord’ (OCP [Oregon Catholic Press]) – we’re singing it this weekend [September 24-25, 2011]. Also, of course, Walker’s better-known ‘At The Name Of Jesus’ (OCP).”)

Intro to Readings
by Gregory Warnusz

First Reading

Early Hebrews liked to believe that children inherit the guilt for their ancestors’ sins, and that sinners cannot really reform. In prior verses, Ezekiel demolishes these traditional beliefs. But this makes the people respond that God’s ways are unfair!

Second Reading

Paul tells his dear friends that what will endear them to him even more is if they behave like Christ. Then he describes Christ by quoting an even older Christian hymn.

Gospel

Jesus upbraids the religious leaders of his day for failing to recognize the hand of God at work in events of their lives.

Key Themes Related to Sunday' Readings

Year A

26th

Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mt 21:28-32

This Week's Theme

The Way to Salvation Through Humility and Repentance

WIKIPEDIA

The Parable of the Two Sons is a parable told by Jesus in the New Testament, found in Matthew (Matthew 21:28–32). It contrasts the tax collectors and prostitutes who accepted the message taught by John the Baptist with the "religious" people who did not.

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1 - Catholic Bible Studies on the Gospel of Matthew
2 - Gospel Harmony
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GOSPELREADINGS 1 & 2CHILDREN

THIS SUNDAY

Sunday Topics

26 Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Way to Salvation Through Humility and Repentance

Gospel : Matthew 21:28-32

TOGGLE TOPICS

Many will enter the reign of God before you if you do not repent.

  • In today’s parable, Jesus compares two sons to two groups of people. The first group spoke piously but did nothing; the second group included sinners who eventually acted in faith and repentance.
  • The sin of the virtuous might be their refusal to act, their refusal to believe.
  • The repentance of the sinners revealed their belief and resulted in action.
SOURCE: Our Sunday Visitor
WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE
The Parable of the Two Sons is a parable told by Jesus in the New Testament, found in Matthew (Matthew 21:28–32). It contrasts the tax collectors and prostitutes who accepted the message taught by John the Baptist with the “religious” people who did not.

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THIS SUNDAY

Sunday Topics

26 Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Way to Salvation Through Humility and Repentance

Reading I : Ezekiel 18:25-28

TOGGLE TOPICS

Turn from what is sinful to what is just and right.

  • The belief that children are destined to bear the burden of their parent’s sins was popular in Ezekiel’s time.
  • God’s people felt that the exile was unfair, that God was punishing them for the sins of their ancestors.
  • In today’s passage, Ezekiel points out; however, that each of us suffers for our own sins.

Reading II : Philippians 2:1-11

TOGGLE TOPICS

Make my joy complete.

  • The Letter to the Philippians presents Christ as the perfect example of obedience.
  • Christ, through obedience, has shown God-likeness so completely that the name of God can be given to him.
  • The model, then, that Paul held up for Christian behavior was the model of the obedient Son.
  • Note that in this year, this same reading was read on the Feast of the Holy Cross. You may wish to use the short form this Sunday.
SOURCE: Our Sunday Visitor

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26 Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Way to Salvation Through Humility and Repentance

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