LectioTube

Catholic videos, podcasts, tweets and more

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

- 1 WEEKSUNDAY+ 2 WEEKS+ 3 WEEKS+ 4 WEEKS

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

25A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

September 20, 2020

2017

The privilege of the mission

Today’s Gospel reading is one of the most confounding. Many people struggle with this parable about the landowner and the workers, but as the old saying goes, where you stumble, that’s where you should dig for treasure. The parable offers a powerful reminder to focus on the mission of God’s kingdom, not who gets credit for it.

2014

Going beyond a mercenary love for God

The Bible constantly warns against a merely mercenary relationship with God—a friendship of convenience or self-interest. We should not love God simply because doing so will produce many consolations in our life. We must enter a true relationship, where we fall in love not with his benefits, but with him.

2011

Seeing the world from God’s perspective

Sometimes Christ does not seem fair. The Parable of the Day Laborers evokes this sense of injustice. Those who do not work as long and hard as the others get the same reward. However, Christ wants us to move beyond our sense of justice and see all according to love, God’s perspective. Gratitude for the gift transforms our natural disposition to judge who deserves what into a disposition of thanksgiving.

2008

As high as the heavens

The Biblical manner of dealing with the problem of evil is neither to deny the fact of evil nor the fact of God’s existence. Rather, it is to stress the transcendence and inscrutability of God’s ways. What looks like pure evil or dumb suffering to us finds its place within the providential plan of a mysterious God.

2005

The generous landowner

The parable that Jesus tells in our Gospel for today is one of his most disturbing and confounding. Giving the same wage to those who worked for one hour and those who labored the whole day just seems unjust. The story is meant to place a question in our minds: what exactly is divine justice and how does it differ from our conception of justice?

2002

The off-putting generosity of God

God’s ways are not our ways; God’s thoughts are not our thoughts. How is God’s love playing itself out in the world? It isn’t always easy to see, for there are so many injustices, so much innocent suffering, so much out of balance. But the dispensing of grace is God’s business, not ours, and so we should ask the question “why?” not in a spirit of rebellion, but in an attitude of awe.

Share this page:

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

26A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

September 27, 2020

2017

In the form of God

Some skeptics suggest the divinity of Jesus is a myth, or a later invention of the Church, that Jesus was nothing more than an ordinary man or great teacher. But in today’s text from St. Paul, an exceptionally early text traced to within a handful of years of Jesus’ death, we find a clear declaration of the contrary. Jesus is described as being in the “form of God,” a staggering claim that affirms his divinity. Yet even still, he did not grasp at his godliness, but emptied himself and took the form a slave.

2014

Let go rather than grasp

Today’s readings show that one can and should stand before God, individually, and assume spiritual responsibility. That responsibility is not collective but personal. It confronts each of us with the question, “Where I do stand in response to God’s invitation?”

2011

Let go rather than grasp

The magnificent hymn in the Letter to the Philippians reveals that at the heart of the Gospel is the mystery that the Lord Jesus did not grasp or cling to the prerogatives that properly belonged to him as God, but emptied his divine glory into our humanity so that we might share in his divine life.

2008

Old Adam or New Adam

Our second reading contains one of the most precious texts in the Christian tradition, Paul’s description of the mind of Christ. While the old Adam clung to godliness and hence fell, the new Adam let go of his divinity and hence reversed the momentum of the fall. What does it mean to be conformed to God? It means to embrace the path of self-emptying love. Which Adam do we choose? The Old or the New?

2005

Jesus the slave

Our second reading, from Paul’s letter to the Philippians, contains one of the oldest texts in the tradition, a “hymn” that Paul received and adapted for his purposes. It speaks of a fully divine Jesus who was, nevertheless, willing to empty himself utterly and become a slave on our behalf. All of the drama, poetry, and power of Christianity is contained in that paradox.

2005

May that same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus

The second reading for Mass today contains one of the most beautiful passages in the New Testament, St. Paul’s hymn to the self-emptying love of Christ. We sinners cling to godliness; the true God does not, but rather gives himself away in humility and love. The cross of Jesus is thus the undoing of the sin of Eden.

Share this page:

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

27A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

October 4, 2020

2017

The vineyard

Today’s readings pose a question: how are we tending the vineyard? We have received so much from God, but are we making the world fruitful? Are we responding to the Lord’s invitation with the works of justice, love, peace, chastity, respect for others? Or are we more or less killing the messengers?

2014

Peace beyond understanding

At the end of his letter to the Philippians, St. Paul reveals the secret to a peaceful life. Serenity of spirit, born of the confidence that one is linked to God, arrives when we surround ourselves with God’s truth, goodness, and beauty.

2011

Parable of the tenants

The magnificent hymn in the Letter to the Philippians reveals that at the heart of the Gospel is the mystery that the Lord Jesus did not grasp or cling to the prerogatives that properly belonged to him as God, but emptied his divine glory into our humanity so that we might share in his divine life.

2008

Lessons from the vineyard

In both the prophet Isaiah and the Gospel of Matthew, we find the image of the vineyard as a symbol of Israel. As Jesus develops this image, we see both the glory and the tragedy of Israel-as well as the promise that the church will emerge as the bearer of the God of Israel to the nations.

2002

Tenants of the vineyard

The world and its wonders are not ours to own. Rather they are given to us in trust; we are their tenants. When we forget this basic fact, we invite disaster and degenerate into moral corruption. We must remember that we are servants and God the master.

Share this page:

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

No posts found.

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

No posts found.
Sunday Liturgy Resources