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Bishop Barron’s Sunday Archive

SUNDAYTWO WEEKSTHREE WEEKSFOUR WEEKS
Easter (A) – Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Sermons

The Resurrection

2019 (Year C)

Three Easter Lessons

The resurrection of Jesus from the dead is the foundation of the entire Christian faith. If Jesus didn’t rise from the dead, we should all go home and forget about it. As St. Paul himself puts it: “If Jesus is not raised from the dead, our preaching is in vain and we are the most pitiable of men.” But Jesus was, in fact, raised from the dead. And his resurrection shows that Christ can gather back to the Father everyone whom he has embraced through his suffering love..

2018 (Year B)

The Empty Grave

Many people enjoy visiting the graves of famous people, from Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, IL to St. Peter in the Vatican. We feel a sense of peace and finality around graves. But the one thing we would never expect in a cemetery is action. Yet that’s precisely what we find at the center of Christianity, as St. John recounts in today’s Easter Gospel.

NOTE: All years (A, B and C) are represented (although each cycle has different readings) because the general theme is the same, and over the years, Bishop Barron has not had many podcasts for this date.
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Divine Mercy (A) – Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Sermons

Second Sunday of Easter

2017

The Mystical Union of Christ and His Church

Jesus has come to bring us the divine life. Under his influence we become peaceful, unafraid, evangelizing, and forgiving. Through the Church, saints are made. This is because Christ is at the very center of the Church.

2008

The Mission of Easter

Essential to the Easter message is mission: we are sent by the risen Jesus to do his work in the world. It is never enough that we contemplate his risen splendor; we must become his forgiveness-bearing presence to those around us.

2005

Falling in Love with God

So many of us skeptical moderns–intellectual heirs of Descartes– identify with doubting Thomas. We too struggle with faith, ask tough questions, want proof. And to some degree, this is praiseworthy. But the trouble with systematic and persistent doubt is that it precludes the possibility of love, for love is always a surrender. “How blessed are those who have not seen and have yet believed,” because they have allowed themselves to fall in love with Jesus Christ.

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3A Sunday of Easter – Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Sermons

The Road to Emmaus

2017

The Pattern of Love

Like the two disciples walking towards Emmaus, a symbol of worldly power and security, and away from Jerusalem, the center of sacrifice, we need to be stopped in our tracks. Christ appears to them, but they do not recognize him. They do not recognize him because they are walking the wrong way. The recognition of the pattern of Christ’s life does come until the Eucharistic act which presents the pattern of sacrificial love. Then they immediately go back to Jerusalem, the place of suffering love.

2008

Emmaus and the Pattern of Redemption

Essential to the Easter message is mission: we are sent by the risen Jesus to do his work in the world. It is never enough that we contemplate his risen splendor; we must become his forgiveness-bearing presence to those around us.

2005

On the Road

The story of the two disciples on the road to Emmaus is one of the best-loved in the Biblical tradition. It speaks to us of the manner in which we come to see the risen Jesus. When we look through the lenses of the Biblical revelation and the Eucharistic mystery, Jesus comes into clear focus. This, of course, is the structure of the Mass, with its liturgy of the Word and liturgy of the Eucharist. The late great John Paul II understood this dynamic in his bones–which is why he traveled so widely to speak the word and make present the Eucharist.

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4A Sunday of Easter – Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Sermons

The Good Shepherd

2017

Apostolic Preaching

Our first reading for this weekend, taken from the second chapter of Acts, conveys one of Peter’s great sermons. If we listen attentively, we can learn a lot about good preaching, but also a lot about the nature of Christianity.

2011

The Shepherd’s Voice

God speaks to us in many ways, especially though the conscience. Since God is a Person, his voice will reach our consciences and lure us to conform our lives to the life of his Son, Jesus Christ. In addition to listening to Christ thought the scriptures, through the teachings of the Church, through the lives of the saints, and through the liturgy, listen to Him speaking to your conscience. He will set you free.

2008

Peter Proclaims Jesus is Lord

Peter’s sermon on Pentecost morning is the model for all evangelical proclamation. He declares that Jesus is both Lord and Messiah, and this straightforward, unambiguous confession leads to conversion on the part of the people. When our preaching about Jesus is wishy-washy, unclear, tentative, we shouldn’t be surprised that no one listens.

2005

Redemptive Suffering

We hear this week from the Apostle Peter, speaking to the Christian community about redemptive suffering. This is the suffering that comes from doing what is right, even in the face of opposition. What it accomplishes is redemption, that is to say, “buying back” for God the one who perpetrates the injustice. No one in our own American tradition understood this principle–and put it into practice–more thoroughly than Martin Luther King.

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