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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

26A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

September 27, 2020

2017

In the form of God

Some skeptics suggest the divinity of Jesus is a myth, or a later invention of the Church, that Jesus was nothing more than an ordinary man or great teacher. But in today’s text from St. Paul, an exceptionally early text traced to within a handful of years of Jesus’ death, we find a clear declaration of the contrary. Jesus is described as being in the “form of God,” a staggering claim that affirms his divinity. Yet even still, he did not grasp at his godliness, but emptied himself and took the form a slave.

2014

Let go rather than grasp

Today’s readings show that one can and should stand before God, individually, and assume spiritual responsibility. That responsibility is not collective but personal. It confronts each of us with the question, “Where I do stand in response to God’s invitation?”

2011

Let go rather than grasp

The magnificent hymn in the Letter to the Philippians reveals that at the heart of the Gospel is the mystery that the Lord Jesus did not grasp or cling to the prerogatives that properly belonged to him as God, but emptied his divine glory into our humanity so that we might share in his divine life.

2008

Old Adam or New Adam

Our second reading contains one of the most precious texts in the Christian tradition, Paul’s description of the mind of Christ. While the old Adam clung to godliness and hence fell, the new Adam let go of his divinity and hence reversed the momentum of the fall. What does it mean to be conformed to God? It means to embrace the path of self-emptying love. Which Adam do we choose? The Old or the New?

2005

Jesus the slave

Our second reading, from Paul’s letter to the Philippians, contains one of the oldest texts in the tradition, a “hymn” that Paul received and adapted for his purposes. It speaks of a fully divine Jesus who was, nevertheless, willing to empty himself utterly and become a slave on our behalf. All of the drama, poetry, and power of Christianity is contained in that paradox.

2005

May that same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus

The second reading for Mass today contains one of the most beautiful passages in the New Testament, St. Paul’s hymn to the self-emptying love of Christ. We sinners cling to godliness; the true God does not, but rather gives himself away in humility and love. The cross of Jesus is thus the undoing of the sin of Eden.

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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

27A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

October 4, 2020

2017

The vineyard

Today’s readings pose a question: how are we tending the vineyard? We have received so much from God, but are we making the world fruitful? Are we responding to the Lord’s invitation with the works of justice, love, peace, chastity, respect for others? Or are we more or less killing the messengers?

2014

Peace beyond understanding

At the end of his letter to the Philippians, St. Paul reveals the secret to a peaceful life. Serenity of spirit, born of the confidence that one is linked to God, arrives when we surround ourselves with God’s truth, goodness, and beauty.

2011

Parable of the tenants

The parable of the tenants is an allegory that presents the relationship of Israel to Christ, but more than this it reveals a necessary truth about the spiritual life: that we are “tenants” in regards to the gifts that God has given us, and when we construe our relationship to God’s gifts as being that of “owners”, rather than “tenants”, the consequences can be quite dire.

2008

Lessons from the vineyard

In both the prophet Isaiah and the Gospel of Matthew, we find the image of the vineyard as a symbol of Israel. As Jesus develops this image, we see both the glory and the tragedy of Israel-as well as the promise that the church will emerge as the bearer of the God of Israel to the nations.

2002

Tenants of the vineyard

The world and its wonders are not ours to own. Rather they are given to us in trust; we are their tenants. When we forget this basic fact, we invite disaster and degenerate into moral corruption. We must remember that we are servants and God the master.

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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

28A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

October 11, 2020

2011

The wedding feast

Jesus tells the story of a King who is inviting people to the wedding banquet for his Son. Some ignore it. Some actively kill the messengers. But this does not deter the King from inviting all to the banquet. Listen to the invitation of the Lord and actively respond to it. That is a decision you will not regret.

2008

The sacred banquet

One of the most powerful and enduring symbols of God’s intention toward the world is the sacred banquet. God wants his life to flow into us and through us to one another. The result of this is life and life to the full. The question posed by the Gospel is this: when the invitation to this banquet comes, do we answer yes or no?

2005

The wedding banquet

God the Father has prepared a wedding banquet for his Son, and we are all invited. That is the poetic summary of salvation that can be found in the parable that Jesus tells this week. The urgent point is this: we must respond to the invitation, and we must don the proper wedding garment. Failure to do one or the other means we miss the celebration.

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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

29A Ordinary Time Podcasts

Bishop Robert Barron | View Upcoming Sundays

October 18, 2020

2017

Caesar and God

Jesus places everything in its proper relationship to God. But he also chastises those who are involved in power games. God is ultimately in charge and rules over even Caesar.

2008

Render to Caesar

The Gospel for today raises the famously complex question of the relationship between “religion” and “politics.” Though there is a legitimate distinction between the two, this can never turn into a separation. We should certainly render to Caesar what is Caesar’s, but we must never forget that even Caesar belongs to God.

2002

Caesar and Christ

We must render to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s. But we must also recall that everything belongs to God, including Caesar! Secular government and culture have their legitimate place, but they are not independent of God and God’s purposes.

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Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

Bishop Barron’s Podcasts

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